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THE LATEST NZJER


New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations
Volume 43  Number 1

In the latest New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations the following topics are covered. If you wish to read the full articles or download the entire NZJER issue you need to subscribe to the NZJER.

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Which Factors Influence New Zealand Registered Nurses To Leave Their Profession?
Willoughby Moloney*, Peter Boxall**, Matthew Parsons*** and Nicolette Sheridan****

Abstract

In the context of a looming shortage, this study uses qualitative data to understand why registered nurses leave the profession in New Zealand, and identify what can be done to retain them. Our analysis points to a set of factors that is positive for retention, including the opportunity to express a value of caring, supportive relationships, and career development prospects. If not experienced, however, these factors can repel registered nurses from the profession. A second set of factors is clearly negative, such as heavy workload demands, bullying, and problems of work-life balance while a third set is economic and demographic.


* Dr. Willoughby Moloney, Lecturer, School of Nursing, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland
** Prof. Peter Boxall, Business School, University of Auckland
*** Prof. Matthew Parsons, School of Nursing, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland
**** Prof. Nicolette Sheridan, School of Nursing, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Massey University


Understanding the effects of Intra-Group Conflict: A Test of Moderation and Mediation
Gaye Greenwood* and Jarrod M. Haar**

Abstract

Intra-group conflict represents the dysfunction that can exist within a team and is likely to lead to poor outcomes including functioning and performance. The present study explores the links between intra-group conflict and job satisfaction, where we expect individual team members to be less satisfied when they perceive greater intra-group conflict. We extend understanding by testing negative affect (mood) as a mediator, suggesting the fighting within teams leads to bad moods that subsequently, lower job satisfaction. We also test supervisor support, suggesting it might moderate the influence of intra-group conflict, reducing detrimental influences. Using a sample of 130 New Zealand employees working in teams, we find that intra-group conflict is significantly related to negative affect and job satisfaction (positively and negatively), with negative affect partially mediating the influence of intra-group conflict on job satisfaction. Similarly, we find supervisor support is significantly related to negative affect (negatively) and job satisfaction (positively), as well as moderating the influence of intra-group conflict on negative affect. Ultimately, the interaction shows that high supervisor support buffers the influence of intra-group conflict on negative affect. We discuss the implications of intra-group conflict and the role of supervisors in aiding work and wellbeing outcomes.

* Mediator and Senior Lecturer in the Management Department in the Faculty of Business Economics and Law at Auckland University of Technology
** Professor of Human Resource Management, Department of Management, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand

The Application of Cameron’s Positive Leadership Model in a New Zealand Law Enforcement Organisation
Jean Martin* and Sarah Wright**

Abstract

This study explored the implementation of Cameron’s (2008) positive leadership model.  The model consists of four strategies: fostering a positive climate, developing positive relationships, engaging in positive communication, and reinforcing positive meaning. Two practices were added as adaptions to the model: setting an Everest goal, and conducting personal management interviews. Journals were kept by each leader, and individual interviews were held with leaders and officers to capture their lived experience of implementing the model. Operational data were collected to indicate achievement of the Everest goal. The experience of implementing the model challenged existing leadership practices, but overall it was a valuable exercise, in terms of positively influencing performance.

*Department of Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
** Department of Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship, University of Canterbury, New Zealand, email:sarah.wright@canterbury.ac.nz


Organisational change, identity and coping with stress
Roy Smollan* and Edwina Pio**
 
Abstract
 
This paper investigates the impact of stressful organisational change, identity and coping with stress in the context of employment relations. We conducted 31 interviews in a New Zealand public healthcare provider in a study designed to investigate the causes and consequences of stressful organisational change and the strategies participants used to cope. Identity in different forms (personal, role social and organisational) emerged as a salient factor, particularly when self-efficacy was challenged, roles were changed, relationships deteriorated and the participant’s value to the group or organisation was questioned. Participants used problem and emotion-focused strategies to cope with the processes and outcomes of change and with identity issues. Our study provides a nuanced perspective of the centrality of identity in navigating stressful organisational change, and contributes to the employment relations literature, particularly regarding occupational safety and mental health. 

*Department of Management, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand 
**Department of Management, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

The ‘Danish Models’ of labour market regulation and their status after recent changes
Herman Knudsen* and Jens Lind**

Abstract

When New Zealand commentators lament the low productivity, high inequality, low wage characteristics of the New Zealand labour market there are frequently pointed to the successful ‘Danish Model’. These references seldom highlight that there is more than one ‘Danish Model’ of labour market regulation and that these ‘models’ have changed over time. For several decades the ’Danish Model’ of collective bargaining has been marketed as the cornerstone of Danish labour market regulation in Denmark and since the late 1990s, Danish ‘flexicurity’ has been praised as an ideal approach for both economic and labour market reasons. This article presents the main characteristics of these ‘models’ and discusses the impact of recent developments that have influenced key structures and institutions underpinning the ‘models’. The main conclusions are, first, that the ‘collective bargaining model’ is still reasonable intact despite the fact that considerable changes have taken place. Secondly, it is argued that the balance between flexibility and social security in the ‘flexicurity model’ has changed so much in favour of flexibility that the model should rather be termed flexinsecurity.

* Herman Knudsen: hk@plan.aau.dk , Aalborg University, Denmark
** Jens Lind: jlind@socsci.aau.dk, Aalborg University, Denmark

The New Perils of Being Unsafe
Nadia Dabee*

Case Note: WorkSafe New Zealand v Budget Plastics (NZ) Ltd

The recent decision of WorkSafe New Zealand v Budget Plastics (New Zealand) Ltd was the first prosecution to be under the Health and Safety at Work Act (HASWA) 2015. The case was brought in the Palmerston North District Court. The Court said that the sentencing principles in Department of Labour v Hanham & Philp Contractors Ltd were still to be applied under the HASWA 2015, but with higher corresponding bands to set the amount of the fines. However, in a significant departure from previous criminal cases under health and safety laws, the Court indicated that, if the circumstances of the offending are egregious enough, it may be willing to disregard pecuniosity as a factor when setting the amount of the fine. Even if the consequence of the fine spells the death of the business. 

* Nadia Dabee, is a Professional Teaching Fellow and PhD Candidate, Department of Commercial Law, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Auckland



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